Most Shared

Health News

Joint Replacement Surgery: Information for Multicultural Communities

What Is Joint Replacement Surgery?

Joint replacement surgery is removing a damaged joint and putting in a new one. A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, and shoulder. The surgery is usually done by a doctor called an orthopaedic (pronounced or-tho-PEE-dik) surgeon. Sometimes, the surgeon will not remove the whole joint, but will only replace or fix the damaged parts.
The doctor may suggest a joint replacement to improve how you live. Replacing a joint can relieve pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.



What Can Happen to My Joints?

Joints can be damaged by arthritis and other diseases, injuries, or other causes. Arthritis or simply years of use may cause the joint to wear away. This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling. Bones are alive, and they need blood to be healthy, grow, and repair themselves. Diseases and damage inside a joint can limit blood flow, causing problems.


What Is a New Joint Like?

A new joint, called a prosthesis (pronounced praas-THEE-sis), can be made of plastic, metal, or both. It may be cemented into place or not cemented, so that your bone will grow into it. Both methods may be combined to keep the new joint in place.
A cemented joint is used more often in older people who do not move around as much and in people with weak bones. The cement holds the new joint to the bone. An uncemented joint is often recommended for younger, more active people and those with good bone quality. It may take longer to heal, because it takes longer for bone to grow and attach to it.
New joints generally last at least 10 to 15 years. Therefore, younger patients may need to have the same damaged joint replaced more than once.


Do Many People Have Joints Replaced?

Joint replacement is becoming more common. More than 1 million Americans have a hip or knee replaced each year. Research has shown that even if you are older, joint replacement can help you move around and feel better.
Any surgery has risks. Risks of joint surgery will depend on your health before surgery, how severe your arthritis is, and the type of surgery done. Many hospitals and doctors have been replacing joints for several decades, and this experience results in better patient outcomes. For answers to their questions, some people talk with their doctor or someone who has had the surgery. A doctor specializing in joints will probably work with you before, during, and after surgery to make sure you heal quickly and recover successfully.


Do I Need to Have My Joint Replaced?

Only a doctor can tell if you need a joint replaced. He or she will look at your joint with an x-ray machine or another machine. The doctor may put a small, lighted tube (arthroscope) into your joint to look for damage. A small sample of your tissue could also be tested.
After looking at your joint, the doctor may say that you should consider exercise, walking aids such as braces or canes, physical therapy, or medicines and vitamin supplements. Medicines for arthritis include drugs that reduce inflammation. Depending on the type of arthritis, the doctor may prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs.


What Research Is Being Done?

Studies of the various forms of arthritis, the most common reason for joint replacement surgery, are helping doctors better understand these diseases and develop treatments to stop or slow their progression and damage to joints.
Scientists are studying replacement joints to find out which are best to improve movement and flexibility. They are also looking at new joint materials and other ways to improve surgery. For example, researchers are looking for ways to reduce the bodys inflammatory response to the artificial joint components, and are trying to learn why some types of prostheses are more successful than others.
Other scientists are also trying to find out why some people who need surgery dont choose it. They want to know what things make a difference in choosing treatment, in recovery, and in well-being.
More information on research is available from the following websites:

    NIH Clinical Research Trials and You helps people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate. Visitors to the website will find information about the basics of participating in a clinical trial, first-hand stories from actual clinical trial volunteers, explanations from researchers, and links to how to search for a trial or enroll in a research-matching program.
    ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions.
    NIH RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications (since 1985) and patents resulting from NIH funding.
    PubMed is a free service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that lets you search millions of journal citations and abstracts in the fields of medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and preclinical sciences.

Health Watch

  [ - ] Video Stories Only  [ - ] Text Stories Only  [ + ] Show All

ABC National Health News

Dallas Conjoined Twins Head to Rehab
The Ezell twins, formerly conjoined, are now happy, healthy and heading to rehab.
Team Hoyt to Run Last Boston Marathon
Dick and Rick Hoyt are 74 and 52 years old and want to slow down.
Girl Mauled by Raccoon Gets New Ear
Dr. Kongkrit Chaiyasate will pull a piece of the girl's rib and mold it into the shape of an ear and put that inside her forearm to grow. Eight weeks later, they will remove it and attach it to her ear.
Pregnancy Weight Has 'Goldilocks Effect' on Baby's Obesity Risk
Find out the impact of gaining too much or too little weight during pregnancy.
How the Polar Vortex Could Create a Pollen Vortex
Why the Polar Vortex may lead to a terrible allergy season.
Health Dept Takes Man With Tuberculosis to Court
Health officials fear he'll exposure others.
Girl With Cerebral Palsy Gets Hospital Visit From Boyfriend
Watch India Brainard's face light up when she sees her boyfriend, Daniel.
New Technology 'Grows' Man-Made Body Parts
A look at the new technology that let's doctors "grow" body parts in the lab.
New NHL Lawsuit Is the Most Graphic Yet
A new lawsuit that accuses the NHL of putting profits before safety is littered with images of bloodied, toothless hockey players.
Researchers Find Google Glass Can Help Parkinson's Patients
As rumors swirl about Google Glass finally being available to the public, the device is already being examined for use as a daily aid for people with Parkinson’s disease.
Heart Recipient Honors 21-Year-Old Donor
Susan Vieira is trying to complete heart donor's bucket list.
Paralyzed Boy Needs 'Votes' for Wheelchair Van
Zakkary Smith, 3, was strapped into his booster seat behind his uncle when a car driven by an elderly man ran a red light and slammed into their vehicle in the middle of an intersection sending it into a ditch. Though Zakk never suffered any direct impact, he experienced a kind of super whiplash called internal decapitation that severed his skull from his spine, stretching the spinal cord.
Boy Who Begged for Amputation 'Nervous' Ahead of Surgery
Amit Vigoda, 11, is having his right leg amputated today in an operation he begged for.
Meet Your Child Before It's Even Conceived
New technology can help parents "preview" potential offspring.
Why Your Spouse May Be 'Hangry' for a Fight
The link between marital discord and hunger pangs.
Mom Whose Child Died After Catching Chicken Pox Advocates for Vaccines
Does vaccine refusal and hesitancy put everyone at risk for diseases?
Watch: Heart Recipient Honors 21-Year-Old Donor
Susan Vieira, 64, made a promise to fulfill Kristina Chesterman's bucket list.
Watch: Boy, 11, Wants Amputation But Is 'Nervous'
Amit Vigoda, who has a painful and rare orthopedic condition, opts for life-changing surgery.
Watch: Woman Poses Daily to Document Year With Lung Cancer
Images capture Jennifer Glass in her first year of cancer treatment.
9 Real Solutions for Seasonal Allergies
To find solutions that actually work, we scoured the latest research. Here's what we found.
6 Food Labels That Don't Mean What You Think They Do
Misunderstanding these labels could be sabotaging your health.
4 Fun Ways to Get Your Vitamin D
Get your vitamin D the old-fashioned way: from good food and a bit of sun.
4 Ways to Stress Less and Look Great
Not only does stress affect your mood—and your midsection—but you can also see it on your skin in the form of lines, rashes, bumps and breakouts. Since we all experience pressure from time to time, the trick is how we deal with it.
 

Enrollment for healthcare exchanges as part of healthcare reform begins October 1 in states where exchanges will be set up. Expect special reports each week from us about what you need to know about 'Obamacare' and the ongoing political fight about its future.

To Learn More About Health Care Reform, Click Here

Navigation

Sacred Heart Health System - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Sacred Heart Cardiology - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Sacred Heart Cancer Center - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Sacred Heart Orthopedics - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Coastal Vein Institute - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
The Endoscopy Center - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Coastal Vascular & Interventional - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Stand Up Open MRI - Health Watch - WEAR ABC Channel 3
Advertise with us!

Tonight on ABC 3

06:30PM Who Wants to be a Millionaire?
07:00PM Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
08:00PM Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
09:00PM Celebrity Wife Swap
10:00PM Channel 3 News

Complete ABC 3 Schedule