Angels In Our Midst

Angels In Our Midst

 
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Angels in our Midst (Over the Rainbow)

Updated: Saturday, August 3 2013, 01:43 PM CDT
Pensacola - Instead of getting angry and feeling helpless over the oil in the gulf, one 12 year old decided to do something. She shows us what happens when you use the gifts of an angel in our midst.

They could easily pass for sisters. Though there's no relation, Brooke McBride and Hanan Tarabay are kindred spirits.

"It's heartbreaking to see those pictures of those animals covered in oil.

"Immediately it's, I can't believe this is happening."

They had a shared reaction to the devastation that oil was leaving along the coast.

"I decided that I had to use my voice to do something about this."

"When I have little Brooke with this open, open heart. I immediately jumped on this idea as well.

Voice teacher and student went to the lucky k recording studio and poured out "a song from the heart."

"I think that somewhere Over the Rainbow gives a lot of hope to people."

"Somewhere Over the Rainbow, there's a better place, and there's a better time, and there's a better environment and ocean."

"And I really do believe that this song does carry that message, to think into the future."

Brooke and Hanan are carrying their message via iTunes. All of the money they raise will go to the World Wildlife Federation and the Adopt a Fisherman Foundation. Simply doing something, using their gifts is helping them cope too.

"It's a wake-up call, to let people know that we need to take care of the planet more.
If you're negative, then nothing will ever become of that."


"It is so easy to just be so negative. And by using our gifts, it will truly get better. It will truly be better.
Everybody has a gift, something. And they can use it"


Angels in our Midst is brought to you by Sacred Heart Children's Hospital.
Angels in our Midst (Over the Rainbow)


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Washington Times