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Sensory wall transcends communication barriers in Milton teacher's class

Sensory wall transcends communication barriers in Milton teacher's class

This Spring, WEAR along with Hill-Kelly Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram are "Paying it Forward to Education". This week, we introduce you to a special needs teacher at East Milton Elementary that wanted to build a sensory wall.

Sounds, instruments, toys. All these things help children in Shana Kunkle's elementary classroom. Her students are non-verbal and have severe needs.

"Their communication is based on emotions or they show us what they want to do. They are all non-verbal, two are in wheelchairs."

Since they don't talk, they learn in other ways. That's why Kunkle wanted a sensory wall for them.

She said, "It's a lot of cause and effect. 'I do this, then this is what happens.' For them that's huge, having those different noises. 'If I hit the tambourine this way, it will make this noise. If I shake it this way, it will make a different noise.'"

She needed money to make that dream a reality but they aren't cheap. That's where Hill-Kelly Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram stepped in by "Paying it Forward to Education" They donated $500 to help her build an interactive sensory wall. There are bells, keyboards, a whack-a-ball, and vibrations on it.

The children love it. The noises make them light up and smile.

Kunkle said, "It helps them get up more, explore more, and interact more."

April Parker is a parent of one of the students. Her son has Cerebral Palsy; she said it makes a big difference.

Parker said, "Anything that's going to stimulate him and give him the opportunity to move by himself, to touch things, explore are all good and helps with his condition."

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