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Spring break alcohol ban in Gulf Shores beaches continues for a second year

Photo source: Channel 3's Anthony Pura

Spring break is in full swing in Gulf Shores and for the second straight year alcohol is not allowed on the sands.

"This year, from what I've seen, it's been very tame," said Sgt. Jason Woodruff of the Gulf Shores Police Department. Woodruff said in the last week, they made about a dozen arrest of spring breakers, about 80 percent of the arrests involved alcohol. The rest was for other banned items like marijuana.

However, some businesses say it's affected crowds. Jamie Gallen, the General Manager at The Hangout, a restaurant and bar on the Gulf Shores said business is good, but not great. He said it's slower than it was last year, when the booze ban was first implemented.

"It came on a little late into spring break [last year]," Gallen said, "but this year, I think there were four or five months for college students to talk about it and consider other destinations as an option."

"The story of spring break last year and this year is on the beach and not so much [our business]," Gallen added. "We do everything we can to control the underage drinking."

Gallen is referring to the large crowds and partying that initially lead lawmakers to put the alcohol ban on the beach.

However, it wasn't hard to find spring breakers on Gulf Shores that didn't seem to be bothered by the alcohol ban. One group was from a university in Indiana.

"This is fine because we're not into the big parties and alcohol littered beaches," Michael Cheesman, 21, said. "We're all 21 so we can go the bars."

"It came on a little late into spring break [last year]," Gallen said, "but this year, I think there were four or five months for college students to talk about it and consider other destinations as an option."

"The story of spring break last year and this year is on the beach and not so much [our business]," Gallen added. "We do everything we can to control the underage drinking."

Gallen is referring to the large crowds and partying that initially lead lawmaker to put the alcohol ban on the beach.

However, it wasn't hard to find spring breakers on Gulf Shores that didn't seem to be bothered by the alcohol ban. One group was from a university in Indiana.

"This is fine because we're not into the big parties and alcohol littered beaches," Michael Cheesman, 21, said. "We're all 21 so we can go the bars."


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