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The showdown over the US spying on allies continues



The showdown over the US spying on allies is showing no signs of going away.

A top German official says he wants to bring Edward Snowden there to talk about what he knows about the NSA surveillance programs.

The Obama Administration acknowledged that at times, US surveillance reached too far, but it continues to defend its tactics.

The Obama Administration continues its damage control over the NSA surveillance leaks. But it doesn't seem to be working.

Germany is still smarting over the reports that the NSA spied on Chancellor Angela Merkel.

And yesterday the top security official there said he will find a way for Nsa leaker Edward Snowden to speak with German officials about what he knows of the NSA surveillance tactics.

The fired former contractor is currently living in Russia, where he was granted asylum in August. He recently landed a job at an it company.

The US position on Snowden remains the same: unauthorized leaks harmful to US, charged with crimes, return here yesterday Secretary of State John Kerry said that US surveillance has been on "automatic pilot."

In some cases, it has reached too far inappropriately but Kerry defended the large scale surveillance that has come under so much fire.

We have actually prevented airplanes from going down, buildings from being blown up, and people from being assassinated because we've been able to learn ahead of time of the plans.

The German Parliament has scheduled a special session next month to investigate the US spying.

 Edward Snowden's US lawyer said there are discussions he might be given asylum to go to Berlin to testify the first time he would be seen in public.