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The following is an archived video story. The text content of that video story is available below for reference. The original video has been deleted and is no longer available.

Three crewmembers attending historical surrender of WWII in Pensacola today

World War II ended in May 1945.
Several months later, American fleets touched down in Japan for the signing of the surrender.
   
Three men who were apart of that historical trip were aboard NAS Pensacola, August 13th.

"This plane brought back so many memories for the three surviving crew members of Flight 7099 which was the first plane to land in Tokyo Bay after World War II including the plane's engineer Mr. Leonard Braswell who's right where he belongs at the engineering station. This is where all the magic happens."

"When I saw this, I said that's what I've got to learn it," said Leonard Braswell.

The flight was navigated by Leonard Cowan. "A navigator makes that so he knows where he's going and he better so he can keep these guys safe."

And they did make it safe, with Jack Weller manning the radio.
The trio had a lot to talk about as they recalled their flight from Saipan to Tokyo Bay.

They say the flight went smoothly until it was time to land. Then there was some confusion.

"But Sir Admiral Nimitz said in the briefing that his plane was to land first and Admiral Sherman says I said land so we landed and then we worried about getting court marshaled for the next ten years. But we didn't and we found out that Admiral Nimitz was off shore where they had 100 boats or so and he wanted to see those ships so it was OK that we landed first," said Braswell.

The plane has been restored to its war time glory and the guys feel right at home, for the most part.

"They've reduced the size of this door at at least that's what it seems like. Although I weighed 160 lbs then not 200," said Braswell.

Now this navigation chart that was used to guide this this plane to Tokyo Bay is back where it belongs, with the plane and for today, with three of the crew members.